Be Productive, Not Busy

Read Tyler Ward’s article here: http://www.tylerwardis.com/busy-isnt-respectable-anymore/

Next time anyone asks me about my life, I guarantee 100% I’ll respond with “busy.” It’s a solution word to describe everything at all times and dismiss any problems in order to address them later, if ever. Yet it lingers heavily afterwards – and guilt trips other people to say “same here” to feel accomplished or valued. What does “busy” really mean though?

Throughout my whole life, and especially through college, I made an effort to stay “busy,” to consume as many opportunities as possible that came my way. But I was constantly seeking more. For what reason? Maybe to feel that I was doing something worthwhile, maybe to feel important. It gave me an adrenaline rush, to think I was racing against time to achieve more than I could manage. “Doing nothing” was a toxic phrase for me because I wouldn’t know what to do with myself. Looking back, in those times I was “busy” I was doing too much and forgetting to make myself a priority. But it wasn’t taking on too many things that got to me, it was getting wrapped up in taking those things and leaving them unfinished – because I was too “busy” all the time.

Like Tyler Ward says, it’s all in my head – the more busy I think I am, the more busy I believe to be, which then causes me to think I have no time for anything. This article challenges us to avoid the word “busy” and replace it with more specific, engaging words to describe our lives. Once we do that, things will seem more real, more connected, and possibly more manageable – leading to solutions for that personal project I keep pushing back or that friend who I haven’t seen in months. Talking about situations in detail makes us think through the process of solving those problems, increasing productivity. I would prefer a productive life over a busy life, thanks.

We all have busy lives. But one person’s busy is different from his best friend’s busy or his neighbor’s busy. And what we often don’t do is un-busy ourselves, to take a step back and think why we’re so busy, what is worth our time, and what isn’t. Then weed out the ineffective and let the essentials grow.

My first sentence is false, then. I’m going to try deleting “busy” from my conversations this week, and instead face those apparently busy issues by thinking through them elaborately. At the end of the week, I will be back here celebrating being queen of productivity with a new blog post.

So life happened, and I didn’t come back a week after. But, I have felt more productive by avoiding the word “busy” and have already gotten back on track with one of my personal projects. This year is off to a good start.

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2 thoughts on “Be Productive, Not Busy

  1. I like this. I hear so many people say they are “busy” that it almost seems like an excuse. I don’t think one is ever too “busy” for anyone or any small thing. Most is in our heads or that we’re just procrastinators who push errands to the back of our minds until we think about it again and we will always remain theoretically “busy” until we accomplish those errands. Being productive is a more positive take on it, for sure! Nice to see you blogging again! :)

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